2009

BENT TO HEAT YOU UP AND COOL YOU DOWN

February 2009. Happynings/Penguin Bar and Gallery

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Bent/Lihis

Translation by Emmanuel Canteras

It is 1934 in Berlin. in accordance with Hitler’s nationwide campaign to eliminate all homosexuals, Maximillian Berger and Rudolf Hennings are sent to a concentration camp. Along the way, Rudy is brutally killed.

Max encounters Horst, a fellow homosexual, in a prisoner train. they fall in love but are forced to resort to extreme measures to ensure their own survival as the Nazi’s attempt to drive them insane.

<stills Bent>

To Heat You Up and To Cool You Down

by David Finnigan

Additional Shows: March, May, December 2009

Two women working in a bar and their thoughts coming to life: Memory, Lust, Adaptability, Imagination/ Desire and Planning/ Habit mechanism.

What do we really think about when a new relationship comes along? 

While one struggles between letting go or falling in love again and going through the same cycle of pain, the other one contemplates on giving love a chance even if it means that the relationship is with the same sex.

All just to heat you up and cool you down. 

<stills THUCY>

WO(E)MEN: Kuwentong Bata & Lihis

May 2009. UP Film Institute, UP Diliman.

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It is 1934. In an all girls’ boarding school, a rumour spreads like a plague about two headmistresses having a lesbian affair. Meanwhile in Berlin, in a struggle to keep themselves sane, male homosexuals make love through words in a concentration camp under the watchful eye of the Nazis.

The woe of men, the woe of women, the woe of mankind. With two plays set in 1934, Sipat Lawin Ensemble’s summer offering looks back on age-old taboos and examines the woe of men and women as they struggle in the midst of our sexually challenged and sexually changing world.

Kuwentong Bata

Joel Saracho’s adaptation of Lillian Herman’s Children’s Hour

It is 1934. Karen and Martha spent their lives establishing the first and only all-girls boarding school in town. Mary Tilford, a cunningly dangerous child, runs away from school. To avoid being sent back, she tells her grandmother vague details about Karen and Martha, now accused of having a lesbian love affair. The rumour spreads, the school closes, and the lives and loves of the two women take a full and fatal turn.
Directed by Tuxqs Rutaquio
<still kwentong bata>

Bent/Lihis

Translation by Emmanuel Canteras

It is 1934 in Berlin. in accordance with Hitler’s nationwide campaign to eliminate all homosexuals, Maximillian Berger and Rudolf Hennings are sent to a concentration camp. Along the way, Rudy is brutally killed.

Max encounters Horst, a fellow homosexual, in a prisoner train. they fall in love but are forced to resort to extreme measures to ensure their own survival as the Nazi’s attempt to drive them insane.

<stills Bent>

Virgin Labfest 5: MPC (Mababang Paaralan ng Caniogan)

by Job Pagsabigan

June-July 2009. Tanghalang Huseng Batute, CCP Complex.

Humdrum pupil Felix Bakat is already the brightest student in the sub-standard Mababang Paaralan ng Caniogan or MPC. He and his two other friends, Erwin & Didai, had the misfortune of being the only three students to report to their class one stormy school day. Their teacher, the terrifying Miss Magnaye, prepares them for her teaching demo which she and her students are scheduled to present before their visiting school superintendent, Mr. Catacutan. On the day of the teaching demo, Erwin & Didai plan to steal from Miss Magnaye’s stock of canned goods; a business the teacher keeps to augment what she earn from the profession she herself despises. But just when Mr. Catacutan is already enjoying the teaching demo, Erwin and Didai are found out. Miss Magnaye points to Felix as the one behind the conspiracy. How the children are eventually cleared of the mischief is no small help from the school’s legendary ghost, Pilita and the violent storm that ties Pilita’s fate to that of Miss Magnaye.

 <photo Jojit>

STRANGE PILGRIMS

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